Watching brief

I’ve spent the day collating assessment marks and building a final term teaching programme – I need to write something more creative (darlings). So, just for the hell of it, a mini-review of the TV highlights I’ve enjoyed since my last post.

Red Riding was great TV, if harrowing in places, and despite it being significantly different from David Peace’s novel. Much was missing from the novel, as my friend Cathi – who spins a mean crime yarn herself – pointed out, but it’s difficult to get everything of a good book into two hours of TV. And when it’s as layered and complex as David Peace book, the filmmakers’ job is an impossible one. Of what was included, the material about the secret state promises to be a strong theme throughout the televisation of the trilogy. It was also good to see a vision of the 70s that was grimy, oppressive and far-removed from the retro glamour of  TV nostalgia shows. I’ll be back for the second film this Thursday.

Saturday nights in front of Total Wipeout has become a bit of a family treat. It’s an unrecognised gem of a gameshow which always has my sons rolling about as hapless contestants attempt the giant bouncy balls and plunge into pits of mud. If you haven’t seen it, you’re missing a treat.

It’s been followed in recent weeks by Let’s Dance for Comic Relief, which has proved to be more of a treat than you might imagine. We’re all set for next week’s final face-off between Robert Webb’s Flashdance routine…

… and the classic Dirty Dancing scene as performed by Paddy McGuinness and Leigh Francis. 

Sunday brought a double treat, catching up with last week’s episode of Mad Men, losing a little steam but still very watchable, and then onto Damages, which is shaping up to be the most fiendishly complicated plotline for years.

#ComicReliefdancing #DavidPeace #Television #TotalWipeout

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I started blogging in 2009. Back then blogging still seemed pretty cutting edge, although the tipping point for it to go mainstream had come around 2005. By the end of the first decade of the century

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